1. SKILLS INFORMATIONS

    1. Purchasing Skills
    2. Using a Skill
    3. Skill Checks
    4. Difficulty Class
    5. Trying Again
    6. Time and Skill Checks
    7. Favourable and Unfavourable Conditions
    8. Checks without Rolls
    9. Opposed Checks
    10. Taking 10
    11. Taking 20
    12. Ability Checks and Caster Level Checks
    13. Combining Skill Checks
    14. Individual Events
    15. Aid Another
    16. Untrained Skills
    17. Skill Synergy
    18. Ability Checks
    19. Skill Descriptions

  2. SKILLS

    1. Appraise
    2. Balance
    3. Bluff
    4. Climb
    5. Concentration
    6. Craft
    7. Decipher Script
    8. Diplomacy
    9. Disable Device
    10. Disguise
    11. Escape Artist
    12. Forgery
    13. Gather Information
    14. Handle Animal
    15. Heal
    16. Intimidate
    17. Jump
    18. Knowledge
    19. Open Lock
    20. Perception
    21. Perform
    22. Profession
    23. Ride
    24. Search
    25. Sense Motive
    26. Sleight of Hand
    27. Stealth
    28. Survival
    29. Swim
    30. Tumble
    31. Use Rope


I. SKILLS INFORMATIONS

In Conan the Roleplaying Game, all characters are self- sufficient, highly capable of turning their hands to just about anything. Though almost all specialise in particular areas of expertise, many also pick up certain skills along the way which might be useful for their roles as adventurers, such as sneaking about, clambering up cliff- faces, spotting an assassin in the night and puzzling out the meanings of ancient rolls of parchment. A barbarian might not be quite so knowledgeable about religion as a priest; nonetheless, even a barbarian will probably pick up bits and pieces of information here and there if he is the typical cosmopolitan, observant adventurer depicted in the Conan stories.

1. Purchasing Skills

Each level, your character gains a number of skill ranks dependent upon your class plus your Intelligence modifier. Investing a rank in a skill represents a measure of training in that skill. Each level, you can spend no more than 2 skill points to improve a skill and you can never have more ranks in a skill than your Level.

In addition, each class has a number of favored skills, called class skills. It is easier for your character to become more proficient in these skills, as they represent part of his professional training and constant practice. You gain a +3 bonus on all class skills that you put ranks into. If you have more than one class and both grant you a class skill bonus, these bonuses do not stack.

If you select a level in a new class, all of its class skills are automatically added to your list of class skills, and you gain a +3 bonus for your new class skills if you have ranks in them.

Using Skills: To make a skill check, roll: 1d20 + skill modifier. The skill modifier is equal to skill rank + ability modifier + miscellaneous modifiers. This roll works just like an attack roll or a saving throw; the higher the roll, the better. Either a character is trying to match or exceed a certain Difficulty Class (DC), or he is trying to beat another character’s check result.


Skill Ranks: A character’s number of ranks in a skill is based on how many skill points he has invested in it. Many skills can be used even if the character has no ranks in them; this is called making an untrained skill check.


Ability Modifier: The ability modifier used in a skill check is the modifier for the skill’s key ability, that is, the ability associated with the skill’s use. The key ability of each skill is noted in its description.


Miscellaneous Modifiers: Miscellaneous modifiers include racial bonuses, class skills bonuses, armour check penalties and bonuses provided by feats, among others.

2. Using a Skill

When a character uses a skill, the Player makes a skill check to see how well he performs. The higher the result of the skill check, the better. Based on the circumstances, the result must match or beat a particular number (a DC or the result of an opposed skill check) for the check to be successful. The harder the task, the higher the number a Player needs to roll.


Circumstances can affect this check. A character that is free to work without distractions can make a careful attempt and avoid simple mistakes. A character who has lots of time can try over and over again, thereby assuring the best outcome. If others help him, the character may succeed where otherwise he would fail.

3. Skill Checks

A skill check takes into account a character’s training, which is represented by his skill rank, his natural talent, which is represented by the ability modifier and an element of luck, which is represented by the die roll. It may also take into account his race’s knack for doing certain things (a racial bonus), what armour he is wearing (armour check penalty) or a certain feat he possesses, among other things.


To make a skill check, roll 1d20 and add the character’s skill modifier for that skill. The skill modifier incorporates the character’s ranks in that skill and the ability modifier for that skill’s key ability, plus any other miscellaneous modifiers that may apply, including racial bonuses and armour check penalties. The higher the result, the better the character performs. A natural roll of 20 on the d20 is not an automatic success and a natural roll of 1 is not an automatic failure, unlike some combat rolls.

4. Difficulty Class

Some checks are made against a Difficulty Class or DC. The DC is a number that is set using the skill rules as a guideline. A skill check must be equal to or higher than the DC in order to succeed.

Difficulty (DC) Example (Skill Used)
Very Easy (0) Notice something large in plain sight (Perception)
Easy (5) Climb a knotted rope (Climb)
Average (10) Hear an approaching guard (Perception)
Tough (15) Rig a wagon wheel to fall off (Disable Device)
Challenging (20) Swim in stormy water (Swim)
Formidable (25) Open an above average lock (Open Lock)
Heroic (30) Leap across 30 foot chasm (Jump)
Nearly Impossible (35) Track a squad of nomads across hard ground after 24 hours of rainfall (Survival)

5. Trying Again

In general, a character can try a skill check again if he fails and keep trying indefinitely. Some skills, however, have consequences of failure that must be taken into account.


A few skills are virtualy useless once a check has failed on an attempt to accomplish a particular task. For most skills, when a character has succeded once at a given task, additional successes are meaningless.

6. Time and Skill Checks

Using a skill might take a round, take no time or take several rounds or even longer. Most skill uses are standard actions, move actions or full-round actions.


Types of actions define how long activities take to perform within the framework of a combat round (six seconds) and how movement is treated with respect to the activity. Some skill checks are instant and represent reactions to an event or are included as part of an action. These skill checks are not actions. Other skill checks represent part of movement.

7. Favourable and Unfavourable Conditions

Some situations may make a skill easier or harder to use, resulting in a bonus or penalty to the skill modifier for a skill check or a change to the DC of the skill check. The chance of success can be altered in four ways to take into account exceptional circumstances:


Conditions that affect a character’s ability to perform a skill change the skill modifier. Conditions that modify how well the character has to perform a skill change the DC. A bonus to the skill modifier and a reduction in the check’s DC achieve the same result. Each creates a better chance of success. However, they represent different circumstances and sometimes that difference is important.

8. Checks without Rolls

A skill check represents an attempt to accomplish some goal, usually while under some sort of time pressure or distraction. Sometimes, though, a character can use a skill under more favourable conditions and eliminate the luck factor.

9. Opposed Checks

An opposed check is a check the success or failure of which is determined by comparing the check result to another character’s check result. In an opposed check, the higher result succeeds, while the lower result fails. In case of a tie, the character with the higher skill modifier wins. If the character’s skill modifier scores are the same, the players must roll again to break the tie.

Task Skill (Key Ability) Opposing Skill (Key Ability)
Con someone Bluff (Cha) Sense Motive (Wis)
Pretend to be someone else Disguise (Cha) Perception (Wis)
Create a false map Forgery (Int) Forgery (Int)
Hide from someone Stealth (Dex) Perception (Wis)
Make a bully back down Intimidate (Cha or For) Special (1)
Sneak up on someone Stealth (Dex) Perception (Wis)
Steal a coin pouch Sleight of hand (Dex) Perception (Wis)
Tie a prisonner securely Use rope (Dex) Escape artist (Dex)

(1) An Intimidate check is opposed by a modified level check, not by a skill check. See the Intimidate skill description for more information.

10. Taking 10

When a character is not being threatened or distracted, his Player may choose to take 10. Instead of rolling 1d20 for a skill check, calculate the result as if you had rolled a 10. Taking 10 makes many routine tasks automatically successful.


Distractions or threats, such as combat, make it impossible for a character to take 10. In most cases, taking 10 is purely a safety measure; the Player knows or expects that an average roll will succeed but fears that a poor roll might fail, so he elects to settle for the average roll, a 10.


Taking 10 is especially useful in situations where a particularly high roll would not help.

11. Taking 20

When a Player has plenty of time, which generally means two minutes for a skill that can normally be checked in one round, one full-round action or one standard action, is faced with no threats or distractions and the skill being attempted carries no penalties for failure, he can take 20.


In other words, he would eventually roll a 20 on 1d20 if he rolled enough times. So, instead of rolling 1d20 for a skill check, he simply calculates his result as if he had rolled a 20.


Taking 20 means that a Player has the time and the inclination to roll repeatedly until he gets a 20. It assumes that he will fail many times before succeeding. Taking 20 takes twenty times as long as making a single check would take.


Since taking 20 assumes that the character will fail many times before succeeding, if he did attempt to take 20 on a skill that carries penalties for failure, his character would automatically incur those penalties before he could complete the task. Common ‘take 20’ skills include Escape Artist, Open Lock and Search.

12. Ability Checks and Caster Level Checks

The normal take 10 and take 20 rules apply for ability checks. Neither rule applies to caster level checks.

13. Combining Skill Checks

When more than one character tries the same skill at the same time and for the same purpose, their efforts may overlap. This can be done in several different ways; each combination is subject to its own set of rules.

14. Individual Events

Often, several characters attempt some action and each succeeds or fails independently. The result of one character’s Climb check does not influence the results of other characters’ Climb checks.

15. Aid Another

A character can help another character achieve success on his skill check by making the same kind of skill check in a co-operative effort. If the helper beats DC 10 on his check, the character he is helping gets a +2 bonus to his check, as per the rule for favourable conditions. A character cannot take 10 on a skill check to aid another character.


In many cases, a character’s help will not be beneficial, or only a limited number of characters can help at once. In cases where the skill restricts who can achieve certain results, one character cannot aid another to grant a bonus to a task that the helper’s character could not achieve alone.

16. Untrained Skills

Generally, if a character attempts to use a skill he does not possess, he makes a skill check as normal. The skill modifier does not include a skill rank because the character has no ranks in the skill. Any other applicable modifiers, such as the modifier for the skill’s key ability, are applied to the check.


Any character may attempt any task, even if he has no formal training (skill ranks) in the appropriate skill. Heroes are highly adaptable, after all. However, he may never achieve more than the most basic success with an untrained skill, however naturally adept he might be, if that skill has ‘trained only’ in its description.


To use a ‘trained only’ skill untrained, the character simply rolls 1d20 and adds his key ability modifier along with any other applicable modifiers. Any die roll result of 10 or above is treated as a result of 10. You cannot take 10 on a check for an untrained skill.


For example, the Vendhyan noble Aisha is trying to read an inscription on a crumbling wall above a narrow ledge. Her first task is to make her way to the end of the ledge to reach the inscription, which calls for a Balance check. Aisha has no ranks in the Balance skill. Balance is not a ‘trained only’ skill, so she simply rolls 1d20 and adds her Dexterity modifier of +2. The d20 roll is 16, which with +2 for her Dex modifier gives a check result of 18. She easily negotiates the ledge. Reading the inscription is another matter. It makes reference to several formulas involving the binding of demon lords and calls for a Knowledge (arcana) check. Aisha has no ranks in Knowledge (arcana), which is a ‘trained only’ skill. Her Intelligence is 17, for a +3 modifier. She rolls 18 on the d20 but because she is using Knowledge (arcana) untrained, this is reduced to 10, for an overall result of 13. The Games Master rules that she understands the basic gist of the inscription but does not glean its full meaning.

17. Skill Synergy

It is possible for a character to have two skills that work well together. In general, five or more ranks in one skill gives the character a +2 bonus on skill checks for each of its synergistic skills, as noted in the skill description. In some cases, this bonus applies only to specific uses of the skill in question and not to all checks. Some skills provide benefits on other checks made by a character, such as those checks required to use certain class features.

5 ranks in… +2 Synergy bonus
Bluff Diplomacy, Disguise, Intimidate, Sleight of Hand
Any craft Appraise checks relating to that craft
Craft (Alchemy) Craft (herbalism)
Craft (Herbalism) Craft (alchemy), Heal
Decipher script Knowledge (arcana)
Escape artist Use Rope checks to bind people
Handle animal Ride
Jump Tumble
Knowledge (Architecture & engineering) Search checks for secret doors and compartments
Knowledge (Geography) Survival
Knowledge (Local) Gather Information
Knowledge (Nature) Craft (herbalism), Handle Animal, Survival (When searching for herbs)
Knowledge (Nobility) Diplomacy
Search Survival checks when following tracks
Sense motive Diplomacy
Survival Knowledge (Nature)
Tumble Balance, Jump
Use rope Climb checks when using a rope, Escape Artist checks when escaping from rope bonds

18. Ability Checks

Sometimes a character tries to do something to which no specific skill really applies. In these cases, he must make an ability check. An ability check is a roll of 1d20 plus the appropriate ability modifier. Essentially, the character is making an untrained skill check, since using a skill for which a character does not have any skill ranks is effectivelyan unmodified ability check.

In some cases, an action is a straight test of one’s ability and there is no luck involved.

Just as characters would not make a Height check to see who is taller, they would also not make Strength checks to see who is stronger. The Games Master is responsible for determining what situations call for ability checks, which ones use skill checks instead and which ones require no rolls at all.

19. Skill Descriptions

This section describes each skill, including its common uses and typical modifiers. Characters can sometimes use skills for purposes other than those noted here. Here is the format for skill descriptions:

II. SKILLS

1. Appraise (Int)

As he rode, he drew from his belt a ring in which gleamed a jewel that snared the starlight in a shimmering iridescence. He held it up to admire it, turning it this way and that. The compact bag of gold pieces clinked gently at his saddle-bow, like a promise of the greater riches to come. – Shadows in Zamboula

Check: You can appraise common or well-known objects with a DC 12 Appraise check. Failure means that you estimate an object’s value at 50% to 150% (2d6+3 × 10%) of its actual value.

Appraising a rare or exotic item requires a successful check against DC 15, 20 or higher. If the check is successful, you estimate the object’s value correctly; if the check fails, you are unable to estimate the item’s value.

A magnifying glass gives you a +2 circumstance bonus on Appraise checks involving any item that is small or highly detailed, such as a gem. A merchant’s scale gives you a +2 circumstance bonus on Appraise checks involving any items that are valued by weight, including anything made of precious metals. These bonuses stack.

Action: Appraising an item takes 10 consecutive full-round actions, a total of one minute.

Try Again: Appraise cannot be tried again on the same object, regardless of success.

Special: A character with the Diligent feat gets a +2 bonus on Appraise checks.

Synergy: If you have 5 ranks in any Craft skill, you gain a +2 bonus on Appraise checks related to items made with that Craft skill.

Untrained: For common items, failure on an untrained check means no estimate. For rare items, success means an estimate of 50% to 150% (2d6+3 × 10%) of the item’s value.

2. Balance (Dex / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: You can walk on a precarious surface. A successful check lets you move at half your speed along the surface for one round. A failure by four or less means you cannot move for one round. A failure by five or more means you fall. The difficulty varies with the surface, as follows:

Narrow Surface Modifiers

Surface DC Modifier (1)
Lightly obstructed +2
Severly obstructed +5
Lightly slippery +2
Severely slippery +5
Sloped or angled +2

(1) Add the appropriate modifier to the Balance DC of a narrow surface. These modifiers stack.

* Being Attacked while Balancing: You cannot move to avoid a blow while balancing, so you cannot dodge an attack. You can, however, use your Parry Defence to defend yourself, though you cannot add your Strength bonus without putting yourself at risk. (If you parry an attack and use your Strength bonus, you must make another Balance check against the same DC to remain standing.) You have no effective defence and can therefore be sneak attacked.

If you have five or more ranks in Balance, you can dodge or parry while balancing and can use your Strength bonus to Parry Defence without risk. If you take damage while balancing, you must make another Balance check against the same DC to remain standing.

Width/Condition Balance DC (1)
Uneven flagstone 10 (2)
7–12 inches wide 10
Hewn stone floor 10 (2)
Sloped or angled foor 10 (2)
2–6 inches wide 15
Less than 2 inches wide 20

(1) Add modifiers from Narrow Surface Modifiers, below, as appropriate.
(2) Only if running or charging. Failure by four or less means the character cannot run or charge but may otherwise act normally.

* Accelerated Movement: You can try to walk across a precarious surface more quickly than normal. If you accept a –5 penalty, you can move your full speed as a move action. Moving twice your speed in a round requires two Balance checks, one for each move action used.
You may also accept this penalty in order to charge across a precarious surface; charging requires one Balance check for each multiple of your speed or fraction thereof that you charge.

Action: None. A Balance check does not require an action; it is made as part of another action or as a reaction to a situation.

Special: If you have the Agile feat, you get a +2 bonus on Balance checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Tumble, you get a +2 bonus on Balance checks.

3. Bluff (Cha)

Check: A Bluff check is opposed by the target’s Sense Motive check. See the accompanying table for examples of different kinds of bluffs and the modifier to the target’s Sense Motive check for each one.

Favourable and unfavourable circumstances weigh heavily on the outcome of a bluff. Two circumstances can weigh against you: the bluff may be inherently hard to believe, or the action that the target is asked to take may go against its self-interest, nature, personality, orders or the like. If the difference is important, you can distinguish between a bluff that fails because the target does not believe it and one that fails because it just asks too much of the target.

For instance, if the target gets a +10 bonus on its Sense Motive check because the bluff demands something risky and the Sense Motive check succeeds by 10 or less, the target did not so much see through the bluff as prove reluctant to go along with it. A target that succeeds by 11 or more has seen through the bluff.

A successful Bluff check indicates that the target reacts as you wish, at least for a short time (usually one round or less) or believes something that you want it to believe. Bluff, however, is not a domination spell.

A bluff requires interaction between you and the target. Creatures that are unaware of you cannot be bluffed.

* Feinting in Combat: You can also use Bluff to mislead an opponent in melee combat to prevent him from dodging your next attack effectively. To feint, make a Bluff check opposed by your target’s Sense Motive check. In this case, the target may add its base attack bonus to the roll along with any other applicable modifiers.

If your Bluff check result exceeds this special Sense Motive check result, the target is unable to dodge or parry the next melee attack you make against it. This attack must be made on or before your next turn.

Feinting in this way against a non-humanoid is difficult because it is harder to read a strange creature’s body language; therefore, you take a –4 penalty on your Bluff check. Against a creature of animal Intelligence (1 or 2) the task is even harder; you take a –8 penalty. Against a non- intelligent creature, feinting is impossible.

Feinting in combat does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

* Creating a Diversion to Hide: You can use the Bluff skill to help you hide. A successful Bluff check gives you the momentary diversion you need to attempt a Stealth check while people are aware of you. This usage does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

* Delivering a Secret Message: You can use Bluff to get a message across to another character without others understanding it. The DC is 15 for simple messages or 20 for complex messages, especially those that impart new information. Failure by four or less means you cannot get the message across.
Failure by five or more means that you have accidentally implied false information, or the receiver has inferred the same. Anyone listening to the exchange can make a Sense Motive check opposed by the Bluff check you made to transmit in order to intercept your message; see Sense Motive.

Action: Varies. A Bluff check made as part of general interaction always takes at least one round and is at least a full-round action, though it can take much longer if you try something elaborate. A Bluff check made to feint in combat or create a diversion to hide is a standard action. A Bluff check made to deliver a secret message does not take an action; it is part of normal communication.

Try Again: Varies. Generally, a failed Bluff check in social interaction makes the target too suspicious for you to try again in the same circumstances, though you may retry freely on Bluff checks made to feint in combat. Retries are also allowed when you are trying to send a message but you may only be attempted once per round. Each retry carries the same chance of miscommunication.

Special: If you have the Persuasive feat, you get a +2 bonus on Bluff checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Bluff, you get a +2 bonus on Diplomacy, Disguise, Intimidate and Sleight of Hand checks.

Bluff Examples

Example Circumstances Sense Motive Modifier
The target wants to believe you -5
The bluff is believable and does not affect the target much 0
The bluff is a little hard to believe or puts the target at some risk +5
The bluff is hard to believe or puts the target at significant risk +10
The bluff is way out there, almost too incredible to consider +20

4. Climb (Str or Dex / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: With a successful Climb check, you can advance up, down, or across a slope, a wall, or some other steep incline, or even a ceiling with handholds, at one-quarter your normal speed.

A slope is considered to be any incline less than 60 degrees; a wall is any incline measuring 60 degrees or more.
A Climb check that fails by four or less means that you makes no progress. A Climb check that fails by five or more means that you fall from whatever height you have already attained.

A climber’s kit gives you a +2 circumstance bonus on Climb checks.

The DC of the check depends on the conditions of the climb. Compare the task with those on the following table to determine an appropriate DC. You need both hands free to climb, though you may cling to a wall with one hand while you cast a spell or take some other action that requires only one hand. While climbing, you cannot move to avoid a blow, so you cannot dodge. You can parry as normal while holding on (assuming you are wielding a one handed weapon) but you cannot make any climb checks to ascend until you stop parrying. You also cannot use a shield while climbing.

Any time you take damage while climbing, make a Climb check against the DC of the slope or wall. Failure means you fall from your current height and sustains the appropriate falling damage.

* Accelerated Climbing: You try to climb more quickly than normal. By accepting a –5 penalty, you can movehalf your speed instead of one-quarter your speed.

Climb DC Example Surface or Activity
0 A slope too steep to walk up, or a knotted rope with a wall to brace against
5 A rope with a wall to brace against, or a knotted rope
10 A surface with ledges to hold on to and stand on, such as a very rough wall or a ship’s rigging
15 Any surface with adequate handholds and footholds (natural or artificial), such as a very rough natural rock surface or a tree, or an unknotted rope, or pulling yourself up when dangling by your hands
20 An uneven surface with some narrow handholds and footholds, such as a typical dungeon or ruin wall
25 A rough surface, such as a natural rock wall or a brick wall
25 An overhang or ceiling with handholds but no footholds
X A perfectly smooth, flat, vertical surface cannot be climbed

Climb DC Modifier Example Surface or Activity
-10 Climbing a chimney (artificial or natural) or other location where you can brace against two opposite walls (Reduce DC by 10)
-5 Climbing a corner where you can brace against perpendicular walls (reduces DC by five)
+5 Surface is slippery (increases DC by five)


* Making Your Own Handholds and Footholds: You can make your own handholds and footholds by pounding pitons into a wall. Doing so takes one minute per piton and one piton is needed per three feet of distance. As with any surface that offers handholds and footholds, a wall with pitons in it has a DC of 15. In the same way, a climber with a hand axe or similar implement can cut handholds in an ice wall.

* Catching Yourself When Falling: It is practically impossible to catch yourself on a wall while falling. Make a Climb check (DC = wall’s DC + 20) to do so. It is much easier to catch yourself on a slope (DC = slope’s DC + 10).

* Catching a Falling Character While Climbing: If someone climbing above you or adjacent to you falls, you can attempt to catch the falling character if he is within your reach. Doing so requires a successful melee touch attack against the falling character, though he can voluntarily refuse to dodge if desired, so that you can catch him more easily.

If you hit, you must immediately attempt a Climb check (DC = wall’s DC + 10). Success indicates that you catch the falling character but his total weight, including equipment, cannot exceed your heavy load limit or you automatically fall. If you fail your Climb check by four or less, you fail to stop the character’s fall but do not lose your grip on the wall. If you fails by five or more, you fail to stop the character’s fall and begin falling as well.

Action: Climbing is part of movement, so it is generally part of a move action and may be combined with other types of movement in a move action. Each move action that includes climbing requires a separate Climb check. Catching yourself or another falling character does not take an action.

Special: You can use a rope to haul a character upward (or lower a character) through sheer strength. You can lift double your maximum load in this manner.

A creature with a climb speed has a +8 racial bonus on all Climb checks. The creature must make a Climb check to climb any wall or slope with a DC higher than zero. It always can choose to take 10, however, even if rushed or threatened while climbing. If a creature with a climb speed chooses an accelerated climb (see above), it moves at double its climb speed (or at its land speed, whichever is slower) and makes a single Climb check at a –5 penalty.
Such a creature can still dodge while climbing and opponents get no special bonuses to their attacks against it. It cannot, however, use the run action while climbing.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Use Rope, you get a +2 bonus on Climb checks made to climb a rope, a knotted rope or a rope-and-wall combination.

5. Concentration (Con)

Check: You must make a Concentration check whenever you might potentially be distracted (by taking damage, by harsh weather and so on) while engaged in some action that requires your full attention. Such actions include casting a spell, concentrating on an active spell, directing a spell, using a spell-like ability, or using a skill that would provoke an attack of opportunity. In general, if an action would not normally provoke an attack of opportunity, you need not make a Concentration check to avoid being distracted.

If the Concentration check succeeds, you may continue with the action as normal. If the check fails, the action automatically fails and is wasted. If you were in the process of casting a spell, the spell is lost. If you were concentrating on an active spell, the spell ends as if you had ceased concentrating on it. If you were directing a spell, the direction fails but the spell remains active. If you were using a spell-like ability, that use of the ability is lost. A skill use also fails. In some cases a failed skill check may have other ramifications as well.

The table below summarises various types of distractions that require you to make a Concentration check. If the distraction occurs while you are trying to cast a spell, you must add the PP cost of the spell you are trying to cast to the appropriate Concentration DC. If more than one type of distraction is present, make a check for each one; any failed Concentration check indicates that the task is not completed.

Concentration DC (1) Distraction
10 + damage dealt Damaged during the action. (2)
10 + half of continuous damage Taking continuous damage during the action. (3)
Distracting spell’s save DC Distracted by non-damaging spell. (4)
10 Vigorous motion, such as on a moving mount, taking a bouncy wagon ride, in a small boat in rough water or below decks in a storm-tossed ship.
15 Violent motion, such as on a galloping horse, taking a very rough wagon ride, in a small boat in rapids, on the deck of a storm- tossed ship.
20 Extraordinarily violent motion, such as an earthquake.
15 Entangled
20 Grappling or pinned. You can only cast spells without somatic components, and only if you have any required material components in hand.
5 Weather is a high wind carrying blinding rain or sleet.
10 Weather is wind-driven hail, dust, or debris.
Distracting spell’s save DC Weather caused by a spell.

(1) If you are trying to cast, concentrate on or direct a spell when the distraction occurs, add the PP cost of the spell to the indicated DC.
(2) For example, damage occurs during the casting of a spell with a casting time of one round or more or the execution of an activity that takes more than a single full-round action, such as Disable Device. Damage may also stem from an attack of opportunity or readied attack made in response to the spell being cast (for spells with a casting time of one action) or the action being taken (for activities requiring no more than a full-round action).
(3) For example, damage is caused by a puncture wound caused by a sabre-toothed tiger.
(4) If the spell allows no saving throw, use the save DC it would have if it did allow a save.

Action: None. Making a Concentration check does not take an action; it is either a free action when attempted reactively or part of another action when attempted actively.

Try Again: A Concentration check may be tried again, though a success does not cancel the effect of a previous failure, such as the loss of a spell you were casting or the disruption of a spell on which you were concentrating.

Special: You can use Concentration to cast a spell, use a spell-like ability or use a skill defensively so as to avoid attacks of opportunity altogether.

This does not apply to other actions that might provoke attacks of opportunity.

The DC of the check is 15 plus the spell’s PP cost, if casting a spell or using a spell-like ability defensively. If the Concentration check succeeds, you may attempt the action normally without provoking any attacks of opportunity. A successful Concentration check still does not allow you to take 10 on another check if you are in a stressful situation; you must make the check normally.

If the Concentration check fails, the related action also automatically fails (with any appropriate ramifications) and the action is wasted, just as if your concentration was disrupted by a distraction.

6. Craft (Int)

Like Knowledge, Perform and Profession, Craft is actually a number of separate skills. You could have several Craft skills, each with its own ranks, each purchased as a separate skill.

A Craft skill is specifically focused on creating something. If nothing is created through the use of a skill, it probably falls under the heading of a Profession skill.

Check: When you are simply attempting to earn a living by your craft, you make a Craft check every week and earn a number of silver pieces equal to your check result. Untrained labourers and assistants earn an average of 1⁄2 sp per day.

The basic function of the Craft skill, however, is to allow you to make an item. The DC depends on the complexity of the item to be created. The DC, your check results and price determine how long it takes to make a particular item. The item’s finished price also determines the cost of raw materials.

When you are attempting to Craft a specific item, you roll a Craft check each week multiplied by the DC required to create the item. You need a total of five times the item’s value in silver pieces to complete it, except if you are carrying out herbalism (see below).

All crafts require artisan’s tools for the best chance of success. If improvised tools are used, the Craft check is made with a –2 circumstance penalty.

On the other hand, masterwork artisan’s tools provide a +2 circumstance bonus on the check.

To determine how much time and money it takes to make an item, follow these steps:
1. Find the item’s price.
2. Find the DC in the table below.
3. Pay one-third of the item’s price for the cost of raw materials.
4. Make an appropriate Craft check representing one week’s work.

If the check succeeds, multiply your check result by the DC. If the result times the DC equals five times the price of the item in silver pieces, you have completed the item. If the result times the DC equals 10 times the price of the item in silver pieces, you have completed the task in one-half the time. Other multiples of five times the DC reduce the time in the same manner.

If the result times the DC does not equal five times the price, it represents the progress you have made in one week. Record the result and make a new Craft check for the next week. You make more progress each week until your total reaches five times the price of the item in silver pieces.

If you fail a check by four or less, you make no progress that week.

If you fail by five or more, you ruin half the raw materials and have to pay half the original raw material cost again.

The DCs for specific items are listed in the above table.

* Creating Masterwork Items: A masterwork item is a tool that provides a bonus based on its exceptional craftsmanship, not through being magical. To create a masterwork item, you must create the masterwork component as if it were a separate item in addition to the standard item. The masterwork component has its own price (100 sp) and a Craft DC of 20. Once both the standard component and the masterwork component are completed, the masterwork item is finished. Note: The cost of the masterwork component is one-third of the given amount, just as it is for raw materials.

* Creating Masterwork Weapons: Masterwork weapons are made according to the normal Craft rules but the smith must have at least 6 ranks in Craft (Blacksmithing) to make them.

* Creating Akbitanan Swords or Superior Armour: A character with the appropriate feat can create weapons or armour of legendary status. See the Feats chapter for details.

* Repairing Items: Generally, you can repair an item by making checks against the same DC that it took to make the item in the first place. The cost of repairing an item is one-fifth of the item’s price.

Action: Does not apply. Craft checks are made by the day or week; see above.

Try Again: You may try again but each time you miss by five or more, you ruin half the raw materials and have to pay half the original raw material cost again.

Special: You may voluntarily add +10 to the indicated DC to craft an item. This allows you to create the item more quickly, since you will be multiplying this higher DC by your Craft check result to determine progress. You must decide whether to increase the DC before you make each weekly or daily check.

Item Craft Skill Craft DC
Stygian Tomb-Dust, Flame-Powder Alchemy 15
Acheronian Demon-Fire, Kothic Demon-Fire Alchemy 20
Golden Wine of Xuthal, Lotus Smoke (any) Alchemy 25
Armour or shield Blacksmithing 10 + DR
Hunting bow Fletcher 12
Any other bow Fletcher (1) 15
Any bow with high strength rating Fletcher (1) 15 + (2X Rating)
Crossbow or Arbalest Fletcher 15
Yellow Lotus Resin Herbalism 15
Black Lotus Juice, Grey Lotus Blossom, Black Lotus Wine, Black Lotus Powder Herbalism 20
Black Lotus Blossom, Green Lotus Blossom, Purple Lotus Juice, Golden Lotus Juice Herbalism 25
Simple melee or thrown weapon Blacksmithing 12
Martial melee or thrown weapon Blacksmithing 15
Exotic melee or thrown weapon Blacksmithing 18
Mechanical trap Trapmaking 15 or Higher
Superior weapon or armour (2) Varies +5
Very simple item (wooden spoon) Varies 5
Typical item (iron pot) Varies 10
High-quality item (bell) Varies 15
Complex or superior item (lock) Varies 20


(1) If you are making a named racial bow such as a Bossonian longbow and you are not a member of the race in question, take a –4 racial penalty to your Craft (bowyer) skill.
(2) You must have the appropriate feat (either Superior Armourer or Akbitanan Smith) to make superior armour or weapons.

* Craft (Domestic Arts): The ability to accomplish tasks necessary for the care and management of a household.

* Craft (herbalism) and Craft (alchemy): Two Craft skills, Craft (alchemy) and Craft (herbalism), are slightly different from the other Craft skills. These skills are not open to all characters, since in the Hyborian kingdoms they are widely regarded as belonging to sorcerers and witches. They have separate entries on the Skills by Class table for this reason. Craft (alchemy) involves making alchemical preparations, while Craft (herbalism) involves making purely herbal potions as well as other natural products such as serpent venom.

A character with five or more ranks in Craft (alchemy) gains a +2 synergy bonus to all Craft (herbalism) checks. Likewise, a character with five or more ranks in Craft (herbalism) gains a +2 synergy bonus to all Craft (alchemy) checks. Furthermore, a character with five or more ranks of Knowledge (nature) gains a +2 synergy bonus to all Craft (herbalism) checks and vice versa.

Craft (herbalism) is also unusual in that the raw materials for it are not usually available for purchase but must be gathered by the herbalist himself. This means, in effect, that there is no cost for raw materials but that the character with the Craft (herbalism) skill must spend a day or more foraging for raw materials before he begins the actual manufacture of the herbal preparation.

This foraging must take place in an environment and area in which the requisite plants actually grow, of course. Thus, it is often necessary to spend a certain amount of time travelling before materials may be gathered and the character may well face various problems, at the discretion of the Games Master, including hostile natives, predatory animals, weird monsters, ghosts, demons and other difficulties.

Each day you spend foraging, assuming you are in the right place, make a Craft (herbalism) check. The DC is dependent on the plant you are looking for and the location in which you are foraging. You may not take 10 on this check, as it is essentially random whether the plant you are looking for is available in the area you are searching.

If you succeed, you have found and gathered sufficient quantities of the plant to make one dose of the appropriate drug; if you roll more than the DC, you have found enough for one additional dose for each +1 that you roll over and above the amount required. You gain a +1 circumstance bonus to this check for each day beyond the first that you spend looking for the plants, as you narrow your searching area.

If you are in a location in which several different useful plants grow, you can gather several different plants during the same day. Make a separate Craft (herbalism) check for each type of plant, though you suffer a –2 circumstance penalty to each check for each type of plant beyond the first.

In most cases, fresh herbs must be turned into the final preparation within 2d6 weeks of being picked or they deteriorate and become completely worthless. If you do not have time to prepare your finds right away, you can spend a day with a Craft (herbalism) check (DC 15) to dry them out so as to preserve them for up to a year. In this case, you will need to make a further Craft check to transform the herbs into the final preparation. This final Craft check is made like any other Craft check, with the check result being compared to the DC and the total cost of the herbal preparation.

The only difference is that there is no raw materials cost, since the raw materials have already been gathered. Furthermore, you need only roll a total equal to the silver piece value of the products, rather than five times the silver piece value. The high price of herbal products is more a reflection of the dangers and difficulties involved in gathering their ingredients than the time and skill involved in brewing them up.

Note that it is possible to prepare a large batch of an herbal product at once, such as when you have large quantities of the plant and need to begin Crafting it into a preparation right away before it rots. However, if you do this, you will not have any finished product until you have made the whole batch. In effect, you are simmering the whole lot together in one cauldron and cannot draw off any for use until it is all prepared.

For versatile plants such as the black lotus, which can be used for a variety of different preparations, each plant you gather will provide enough to make one dose of each of the various preparations.

Plant or Animal DC to gather (by location)
Apples of Derketa 20 (jungles of northern Black Kingdoms)
Black Lotus 25 (jungles of northern Black Kingdoms), or 20 (banks of Zarkheba River)
Golden Lotus 30 (jungles of Khitai)
Green Lotus 20 (jungles of Khitai)
Grey Lotus 25 (Swamps of the Dead beyond Khitai)
Purple Lotus 25 (ghost-haunted swamps of southern Stygia)
Yellow Lotus 15 (jungles of northern Black Kingdoms)

For example, Ankh-af-na-Khonsu is searching for the dreaded black lotus on the banks of the Zarkheba River. His Craft (herbalism) skill is +19 and he rolls a 13 for a total of 32 on the first day, finding 13 doses of lotus: one for meeting the DC, +12 for rolling 12 above the DC. He has come a long way, so he braves the man-apes, poisonous foliage, were-beasts and demons of that notorious jungle for a second day and rolls a 4, +1, for a total of 24.

He thus finds five more plants: one for meeting the DC, +4 for getting 4 above the DC. With a total of eighteen black lotus plants in his basket, he heads north for the relative civilisation of Kush.

Ankh-af-na-Khonsu decides to pause and make up his various preparations before his plants begin to rot. He plans to make black lotus wine, black lotus juice, black lotus blossoms and black lotus powder. First of all, he spends a day drying his finds with another Herbalism check (DC 15), which he passes by taking 10.

He makes up batches of 18 doses of each preparation and simmers away. The total time it will take him to make these is dependent on his Craft (herbalism) skill checks but in effect he needs to make a total of 42,300 sp worth of preparations: 18 × 300 sp = 5,400 sp for the black lotus powder, 18 × 50 sp = 900 sp for the black lotus wine, 18 × 1,250 sp = 22,500 sp for the black lotus blossoms and 18 × 750 sp = 13,500 sp for the black lotus juice. Ankh-af-na-Khonsu is simply going to take 10 with each roll so as to save time and reduce his margin of error. He starts with the powder. He rolls 10 + 19 = 29 each week, allowing him to make 29 × 20 = 580 sp worth of progress each week. It takes him a total of 10 weeks to make 18 doses of black lotus powder.

Next he makes the blossoms, making 29 × 25 = 725 sp worth of progress each week. It takes him another 32 weeks to make the full 22,500 worth of blossoms. Next he makes the wine, which is also DC 20, so again he makes 580 sp worth of progress per week; two weeks later he has 18 doses of the wine.

Finally he makes the juice, again a DC 20 job, which takes him 24 weeks more. In total, he has spent over a year and a quarter on making herbal preparations, plus gathering and travelling time. On the upside, he has enough black lotus powder to last him for several bouts of intense sorcery, enough wine to sell to fund his journey back to Stygia in style, enough blossoms to have 18 wild lotus-dreams and enough juice to poison all his superiors in the Black Ring sorcerous society, if he can just find someone to deliver the doses...


Synergy: If you have five ranks in a Craft skill, you get a +2 bonus on Appraise checks related to items made with that Craft skill.

7. Decipher Script (Int / Trained Only)

Check: You can decipher writing in an unfamiliar language or a message written in an incomplete or archaic form. The base DC is 20 for the simplest messages, 25 for standard texts and 30 or higher for intricate, exotic or very old writing.

If the check succeeds, you understand the general content of approximately one page of writing or the equivalent. If the check fails by 5 or less, you draw a false conclusion about the text.

The Decipher Script check is made secretly so you cannot tell whether the conclusion you draw is true or false.

Action: Deciphering the equivalent of a single page of script takes 10 consecutive full-round actions, which is a total of one minute.

Try Again: You may not try this check again.

Special: A character with the Diligent feat gets a +2 bonus on Decipher Script checks.

Synergy: A character with five or more ranks in Decipher Script gets a +2 bonus on Knowledge (arcana) checks.

8. Diplomacy (Cha)

Check: You can change the attitudes of others (Non-Player Characters) with a successful Diplomacy check; see the sidebar below for basic DCs. In negotiations, participants roll opposed Diplomacy checks and the winner gains the advantage. Opposed checks also resolve situations when two advocates or diplomats plead opposite cases in a hearing before a third party.

Action: Changing others’ attitudes with Diplomacy generally takes at least 10 consecutive full-round actions, which is a total of one minute. In some situations, this time requirement may greatly increase. A rushed Diplomacy check can be made as a full-round action but you take a –10 penalty on the check.

Try Again: Retries are optional but not recommended because they usually do not work. Even if the initial Diplomacy check succeeds, the other character can be persuaded only so far and a retry may do more harm than good. If the initial check fails, the other character has probably become more firmly committed to his position and a retry is futile.

Special: If you have the Negotiator feat, you get a +2 bonus on Diplomacy checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Bluff, Knowledge (nobility and royalty) or Sense Motive, you get a +2 bonus on Diplomacy checks.

Attitude Means Possible actions
Hostile Will take risks to hurt you Attack, interfere, berate, flee
Unfriendly Wishes you ill Mislead, gossip, avoid, watch suspiciously, insult
Indifferent Does not much care Socially expected interaction
Friendly Wishes you well Chat, advise, offer limited help, advocate
Helpful Will take risks to help you Protect, back up, heal, aid


Initial Attitude/New Attitude (DC to achieve) Hostile Unfriendly Indifferent Friendly Helpful
Hostile X 20 25 35 50
Unfriendly X X 15 25 40
Indifferent X X X 15 30
Friendly X X X X 20
Helpful X X X X X

9. Disable Device (Int / Trained Only)

Check: The Disable Device check is made secretly so you do not necessarily know whether you have succeeded. The DC depends on how tricky the device is. Disabling (or rigging or jamming) a fairly simple device has a DC of 10; more intricate and complex devices have higher DCs.

If the check succeeds, you disable the device. If it fails by four or less, you have failed but can try again. If you fail by five or more, something goes wrong. If the device is a trap, you spring it. If you are attempting some sort of sabotage, you think the device is disabled when it is not.

You also can rig simple devices such as saddles or wagon wheels to work normally for a while and then fail or fall off some time later, usually after 1d4 rounds or minutes of use.

Action: The amount of time needed to make a Disable Device check depends on the task, as noted above. Disabling a simple device takes one round and is a full- round action. An intricate or complex device requires 1d4 or 2d4 rounds.

Try Again: You can retry if you miss the check by four or less, though you must be aware that you failed in order to try again.

Special: If you have the Nimble Fingers feat, you get a +2 bonus on Disable Device checks.

Device Time Disable Device DC (1) Example
Simple 1 round 10 Jam a lock
Tricky 1D4 rounds 15 Sabotage awagon wheel
Difficult 2D4 rounds 20 Disarm a trap,reset a trap
Wicked 2D4 rounds 25 Disarm a complex trap, cleverly sabotage a clockwork device

(1) If you attempt to leave behind no trace of your tampering, add five to the DC.

Other Ways to avoid traps

It is possible to ruin many traps without making a Disable Device check.
* Ranged Attack Traps: Once a trap’s location is known, the obvious way to ruin it is to smash the mechanism, assuming the mechanism can be accessed. Failing that, it is possible to plug up the holes from which the projectiles emerge. Doing this prevents the trap from firing unless its ammunition deals enough damage to break through the plugs.

* Melee Attack Traps: You can thwart these devices by smashing the mechanism or blocking the weapons, as noted above. Alternatively, if a character studies the trap as it triggers, he might be able to time his dodges just right to avoid damage. A character who is doing nothing but studying a trap when it first goes off gains a +4 dodge bonus to Dodge Defence against its attacks if it is triggered again within the next minute.

* Pits: Disabling a pit trap generally ruins only the trapdoor, turning the trap into an uncovered pit. Filling in the pit or building a makeshift bridge across it is an application of manual labour and does not require the Disable Device skill. Characters could neutralise any spikes at the bottom of a pit by attacking them, since they break just as daggers do.

10. Disguise (Cha)

Check: Your Disguise check result determines how good your disguise is. It is opposed by others’ Perception check results. If you do not draw any attention to yourself, others do not get to make Perception checks. If you come to the attention of a person who is suspicious of you, such as a guard who watches commoners walking through a city gate, it can be assumed that person has taken 10 on his Perception checks.

You get only one Disguise check per use of the skill, even if several people make Perception checks against it. The Disguise check is made secretly so you cannot be sure how good the result is.

The effectiveness of your disguise depends in part on how much you attempt to change your appearance.

Disguise Disguise Check Modifier
Minor details only +5
Disguised as a different gender (1) -2
Disguised as a different race (1) -2
Disguised as a different age category (1) -2 (2)

(1) These modifiers are cumulative; use any that apply.
(2) Per step of difference between your actual age category and your disguised age category. The steps are: young (younger than adulthood), adulthood, middle age, old and venerable.

If you impersonate a particular individual, those who know what that person looks like get a bonus on their Perception checks according to the table below. Furthermore, they are automatically considered to be suspicious of you, so opposed checks are always called for.

Familiarity Viewer’s Perception Check Bonus
Recognises on sight +4
Friends or associates +6
Close friends +8
Intimate +10

Usually, an individual makes a Perception check to see through your disguise immediately upon meeting you and each hour thereafter. If you casually meet many different creatures, each for a short time, check once per day or hour using an average Perception modifier for the group.

Action: Creating a disguise requires 1d3 × 10 minutes of work.

Try Again: You may try to reapply a failed disguise but once others know that a disguise was attempted, they will be more suspicious. If you have the Deceptive feat, you get a +2 bonus on Disguise checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Bluff, you get a +2 bonus on Disguise checks when you know you are being observed and you try to act in character.

11. Escape Artist (Dex / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: The table below gives the DCs for escaping various forms of restraints.

* Ropes: Your Escape Artist check is opposed by the binder’s Use Rope check. As it is easier to tie someone up than to escape, the binder gets a +10 bonus on his check.

* Manacles and Masterwork Manacles: The DC for manacles is set by their construction.

* Tight Space: The DC noted in the table is for getting through a space through which your head fits but your shoulders do not. If the space is long you may need to make multiple checks. You cannot get through a space through which your head does not fit.

* Grappler: You can make an Escape Artist check opposed by your enemy’s grapple check to get out of a grapple or get unpinned, so that you are only grappling.

Restraint Escape Artist DC
Ropes Binder’s Use Rope check at +10
Net 20
Manacles 30
Tight Space 30
Masterwork Manacles 35
Grappler Grappler’s Grapple Check result

Action: Making an Escape Artist check to escape from rope bindings, manacles or other restraints (except a grappler) requires one minute of work. Escaping from a net is a full- round action. Escaping from a grapple or pin is a standard action. Squeezing through a tight space takes at least one minute depending on how long the space is.

Try Again: You can make another check after a failed check if you are squeezing your way through a tight space, which requires multiple checks. If the situation permits, you can make additional checks, or even take 20, as long as you are not being actively opposed.

Special: If you have the Agile feat, you get a +2 bonus on Escape Artist checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Escape Artist, you get a +2 bonus on Use Rope checks to bind someone. If you have five or more ranks in Use Rope, you get a +2 bonus on Escape Artist checks when escaping from rope bonds.

12. Forgery (Int)

Check: Forgery requires writing materials appropriate to the document being forged, enough light or sufficient visual acuity to see the details of what you are writing, wax for seals if appropriate and some time. To forge a document on which the handwriting is not specific to a person, such as military orders, a government decree, a business ledger or the like, you need only to have seen a similar document before and you gain a +8 bonus on your check.

To forge a signature, you need an autograph of that person to copy and you gain a +4 bonus on the check. To forge a longer document written in the hand of some particular person, a large sample of that person’s handwriting is needed.

The Forgery check is made secretly so you are not sure how good your forgery is. As with Disguise, you do not even need to make a check until someone examines the work. Your Forgery check is opposed by the Forgery check of the person who examines the document’s authenticity. The examiner gains modifiers on his check if any of the conditions on the table below apply:

Condition Reader’s Forgery Check Modifier
Type of document unknown to reader -2
Type of document somewhat known to reader 0
Type of document well known to reader +2
Handwriting not known to reader -2
Handwriting somewhat known to reader 0
Handwriting intimately known to reader +2
Reader only casually reviews the document -2

A document that contradicts procedure, orders or previous knowledge, or that requires sacrifice on the part of the person checking the document, can increase that character’s suspicion and thus create favourable circumstances for the checker’s opposing Forgery check.

Action: Forging a very short and simple document takes about one minute. A longer or more complex document takes 1d4 minutes per page.

Try Again: Retries are usually not permitted. A retry is never possible after a particular reader detects a particular forgery. The document created by the forger might still fool someone else, however. The result of a Forgery check for a particular document must be used every time a different reader examines the document. No reader can attempt to detect a particular forgery more than once; if the one opposed check goes in favour of the forger, the reader cannot try using his own skill again, even if he is suspicious about the document.

Special: If you have the Deceitful feat, you get a +2 bonus on Forgery checks.

Restriction: Forgery is language-dependent; thus, to forge documents and detect forgeries, you must be able to read and write the language in question. A character cannot learn the Forgery skill unless he has learned to read and write.

13. Gather Information (Cha)

Check: An evening’s time, a few silver pieces for buying drinks and making friends and a DC 10 Gather Information check will gain you a general idea of a city’s major news items, assuming there are no obvious reasons why the information would be withheld. The higher your check result, the better the information.

If you want to find out about a specific rumour or a specific item, obtain a map or do something else along those lines, the DC for the check is at least 15 to 25.

Action: A typical Gather Information check takes 1d4+1 hours.

Try Again: You may try this check again but it takes time. Furthermore, you may draw attention to yourself if you repeatedly pursuea certain type of information.

Special: If you have the Investigator feat, you get a +2 bonus on Gather Information checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (local), you get a +2 bonus on Gather Information checks.

14. Handle Animal (Cha / Trained Only)

Check: The DC depends on what you are trying to do.

Task Handle Animal DC
Handle an animal 10
‘Push’ an animal 25
Teach an animal a trick 15 or 20 (1)
Train an animal for a general purpose 15 or 20 (1)
Rear a wild animal 15 + HD of animal

(1) See the specific trick or purpose below.

General Purpose DC
Combat Riding 20
Fighting 20
Guarding 20
Heavy Labour 15
Hunting 20
Performance 15
Riding 15

* Handle an Animal: This task involves commanding an animal to perform a task or trick that it knows. If the animal is wounded or has taken any nonlethal damage or ability score damage, the DC increases by two. If your check succeeds, the animal performs the task or trick on its next action.

* ‘Push’ an Animal: To push an animal means to get it to perform a task or trick that it does not know but is physically capable of performing. This category also covers making an animal perform a forced march or forcing it to hustle for more than one hour between sleep cycles. If the animal is wounded or has taken any nonlethal damage or ability score damage, the DC increases by two. If your check succeeds, the animal performs the task or trick on its next action.

* Teach an Animal a Trick: You can teach an animal a specific trick with one week of work and a successful Handle Animal check against the indicated DC. An animal with an Intelligence score of one can learn a maximum of three tricks, while an animal with an Intelligence score of two can learn a maximum of six tricks. Possible tricks and their associated DCs include but are not necessarily limited to:

Attack (DC 20): The animal attacks apparent enemies.
You may point to a particular creature that you wish the animal to attack and it will comply if able. Normally, an animal will attack only humanoids, monstrous humanoids, giants or other animals. Teaching an animal to attack all creatures, including such unnatural creatures as demons, counts as two tricks.

Come (DC 15): The animal comes to you, even if it normally would not do so.

Defend (DC 20): The animal defends you or is ready to defend you if no threat is currently present, even without any command being given. Alternatively, you can command the animal to defend a specific other character.

Down (DC 15): The animal breaks off from combat or otherwise backs down. An animal that does not know this trick continues to fight until it must flee (due to injury, a fear effect or the like) or its opponent is defeated.

Fetch (DC 15): The animal goes and gets something. If you do not point out a specific item, the animal fetches some random object.

Guard (DC 20): The animal stays in place and prevents others from approaching.

Heel (DC 15): The animal follows you closely, even to places where it normally would not go.

Perform (DC 15): The animal performs a variety of simple tricks, such as sitting up, rolling over, roaring, barking and so on.

Seek (DC 15): The animal moves into an area and looks around for anything that is obviously alive or animate.

Stay (DC 15): The animal stays in place, waiting for you to return. It does not challenge other creatures that come by, though it still defends itself if it needs to.

Track (DC 20): The animal tracks the scent presented to it. The animal must have the scent ability.

Work (DC 15): The animal pulls or pushes a medium or heavy load.

* Train an Animal for a Purpose: Rather than teaching an animal individual tricks, you can simply train it for a general purpose. Essentially, an animal’s purpose represents a preselected set of known tricks that fit into a common scheme, such as guarding or heavy labour. The animal must meet all the normal prerequisites for all tricks included in the training package. If the package includes more than three tricks, the animal must have an Intelligence score of two.

An animal can be trained for only one general purpose, though if the creature is capable of learning additional tricks, it may do so. Training an animal for a purpose requires fewer checks than teaching individual tricks but takes the same amount of time.

Combat Riding (DC 20): An animal trained to bear a rider into combat knows the tricks attack, come, defend, down, guard and heel. Training an animal for combat riding takes six weeks. You may also ‘upgrade’ an animal trained for riding to one trained for combat riding by spending three weeks and making a successful DC 20 Handle Animal check.

The new general purpose and tricks completely replace the animal’s previous purpose and any tricks it once knew. Warhorses are already trained to bear riders into combat and do not require any additional training for this purpose.

Fighting (DC 20): An animal trained to engage in combat knows the tricks attack, down and stay. Training an animal for fighting takes three weeks.

Guarding (DC 20): An animal trained to guard knows the tricks attack, defend, down and guard. Training an animal for guarding takes four weeks.

Heavy Labour (DC 15): An animal trained for heavy labour knows the tricks come and work. Training an animal for heavy labour takes two weeks.

Hunting (DC 20): An animal trained for hunting knows the tricks attack, down, fetch, heel, seek and track. Training an animal for hunting takes six weeks.

Performance (DC 15): An animal trained for performance knows the tricks come, fetch, heel, perform and stay. Training an animal for performance takes five weeks.

Riding (DC 15): An animal trained to bear a rider knows the tricks come, heel and stay. Training an animal for riding takes three weeks.

* Rearing a Wild Animal: To rear an animal means to raise a wild creature from infancy so that it becomes domesticated. A handler can rear as many as three creatures of the same kind at once. A successfully domesticated animal can be taught tricks at the same time that it is being raised or it can be taught as a domesticated animal later.

Action: Handling an animal is a move action, while pushing an animal is a full-round action. For tasks with specific time frames, you must spend half this time (at the rate of three hours per day per animal being handled) working toward completion of the task before you attempt the Handle Animal check.

If the check fails, your attempt to teach, rear or train the animal fails and you need not complete the teaching, rearing or training time. If the check succeeds, you must invest the remainder of the time to complete the teaching, rearing or training. If the time is interrupted or the task is not followed through to completion, the attempt to teach, rear or train the animal automatically fails.

Try Again: You may try again, except when you are rearing an animal.

Special: You can use this skill on a creature that is not an animal, so long as the creature has an Intelligence score of one or two. The DC of any such check increases by five. Such creatures have the same limit on known tricks as animals do.

If you have the Animal Affinity feat, you get a +2 bonus on Handle Animal checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Handle Animal, you get a +2 bonus on Ride checks.

Untrained: If you have no ranks in Handle Animal, you can use a Charisma check to handle and push domestic animals but you cannot teach, rear or train animals.

15. Heal (Wis)

In Conan the Roleplaying Game, magical healing is extremely rare; therefore, most characters are tougher, hardier and derive more benefit from simple doctoring than their counterparts in other fantasy games.

Check: The DC and effect depend on the task.

Task DC
First aid 15
Long-term care 15
Short-term care 15
Treat poison Poison’s DC
Treat disease Disease’s DC

* First Aid: Administering first aid means saving a dying character. If a character has negative hit points and is losing hit points (at one per round, one per hour or one per day), the healing character can make him stable. The injured character regains no hit points but he does stop losing them. The check is a standard action.

* Long-term Care: Providing long-term care means treating a wounded person for a day or more. If successful, the character lets the patient recover hit points or ability score points (lost to temporary damage) at twice the normal rate. See the Healing rules, page 191. The healing character can tend up to six patients at a time. He needs a few items and supplies (bandages, salves and so on) that are easy to come by in settled lands.

Giving long-term care counts as light activity for the healer. A character cannot give long-term care to himself.

A healer’s kit gives a +2 circumstance bonus to Heal checks.

* Short-term Care: Providing short-term care means spending 10 minutes cleaning and sewing up wounds, applying herbal poultices and so on. After each combat in which a creature is wounded, up to one character may give him short-term care. If the Heal check is successful, the patient regains (one per character level) + Con modifier in hit points (minimum one).

* Treat Poison: Treating poison means tending a single character who has been poisoned and who is going to take more damage from the poison or suffer some other effect. Every time the poisoned character makes a saving throw against the poison, the healing character makes a Heal check. The poisoned character uses the healing character’s result in place of his saving throw if the healing character’s Heal result is higher.

* Treat Disease: Treating a disease means tending a diseased character. Every time the diseased character makes a saving throw against disease effects, the healing character makes a Heal check. The diseased character uses the healing character’s result in place of his saving throw if the healing character’s Heal result is higher.

Synergy:If a character has five or more ranks in Craft (herbalism) he gets a +2 synergy bonus on Heal checks

16. Intimidate (Var)

Intimidation is a skill which can be used in many different ways.

Bully (Str): your muscles scare people.

Overawe (Dex): an agile grace that intimidate others watching.

Frighten (Con): Your posture and exhilerating presence, confuses folk and makes them bow to you as you pass.

Terrorise (Int): Your intellect demure cause people to tell you what they know.

Admonish (Wis): Your essance radiate power and they feel it.

Coerce (Cha): Your words penetrate their soul, giving you the information you needed.

Check: You can change another’s behaviour with a successful Intimidate check. Your Intimidate check is opposed by the target’s modified level check. This is resolved as 1d20 + character level or Hit Dice + target’s Wisdom bonus (if any) + target’s modifiers on saving throws against fear.

If you beat your target’s check result, you may treat the target as friendly but only for the purpose of actions taken while it remains intimidated. That is, the target retains its normal attitude but will chat, advise, offer limited help or advocate on your behalf while intimidated. See the Diplomacy skill, above, for additional details. The effect lasts as long as the target remains in your presence and for 1d6×10 minutes afterward. After this time, the target’s default attitude toward you shifts to unfriendly or, if normally unfriendly, to hostile.

If you fail the check by five or more, the target provides you with incorrect or useless information, or otherwise frustrates your efforts.

* Demoralize Opponent: You can use this skill to cause an opponent to become shaken for a number of rounds. This shaken condition doesn’t stack with other shaken conditions to make an affected creature frightened. The DC of this check is equal to 10 + the target’s Hit Dice + the target’s Wisdom modifier.

Success: If you win, the target becomes shaken for one round. A shaken character takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls, ability checks and saving throws. This duration increases by 1 round for every 5 by which you beat the DC. You can only threaten an opponent this way if it is within 30 feet and can clearly see and hear you. Using demoralize on the same creature only extends the duration; it does not create a stronger fear condition.

Fail: The opponent is not shaken.You can also use Intimidate to weaken an opponent’s resolve in combat. To do so, make an Intimidate check opposed by the target’s modified level check (see above).

Action: Changing another’s behaviour requires one minute of interaction. Intimidating an opponent in combat is a standard action.

Try Again: Trying again is optional but not recommended because retries usually do not work. Even if the initial check succeeds, the other character can be intimidated only so far and a retry does not help. If the initial check fails, the other character has become more firmly resolved to resist the intimidator and a retry is futile.

Special: You gain a +4 bonus on your Intimidate check for every size category that you are larger than your target. Conversely, you take a –4 penalty on your Intimidate check for every size category that you are smaller than your target.

Character immune to fear and non-intelligent creatures cannot be intimidated.

If you have the Persuasive feat, you get a +2 bonus on Intimidate checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Bluff, you get a +2 bonus on Intimidate checks.

17. Jump (Str / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: The DC and the distance you can cover vary according to the type of jump you are attempting. Your Jump check is modified by your speed. If your speed is 30 feet, no modifier based on speed applies to the check. If your speed is less than 30 feet, you take a –6 penalty for every 10 feet of speed less than 30 feet. If your speed is greater than 30 feet, you gain a +4 bonus for every 10 feet beyond 30 feet.

All Jump DCs given here assume that you get a running start, which requires that you move at least 20 feet in a straight line before attempting the jump. If you do not get a running start, the DC for the jump is doubled. Distance moved by jumping is counted against your normal maximum movement in a round.

If you have ranks in Jump and you succeed on a Jump check, you land on your feet, when appropriate. If you attempt a Jump check untrained, you land prone unless you beat the DC by five or more.

* Long Jump: A long jump is a horizontal jump made across a gap like a chasm or stream. At the midpoint of the jump, you attain a vertical height equal to one-quarter of the horizontal distance. The DC for the jump is equal to the distance jumped in feet.

If your check succeeds, you land on your feet at the far end. If you fail the check by less than five, you do not clear the distance but you can make a DC 15 Reflex saving throw to grab the far edge of the gap. You end your movement grasping the far edge. If that leaves you dangling over a chasm or gap, getting up requires a move action and a DC 15 Climb check.

Long Jump Distance Jump DC (1)
5 feet 5
10 feet 10
15 feet 15
20 feet 20
25 feet 25
30 feet 30

(1) Requires a 20-foot running start. Without a running start, double the DC.

* High Jump: A high jump is a vertical leap to reach a ledge high above or to grasp something overhead. The DC is equal to four times the distance to be cleared.

If you jump up to grab something, a successful check indicates that you reach the desired height. If you wish to pull yourself up, you can do so with a move action and a DC 15 Climb check. If you fail the Jump check, you do not reach the height and you land on your feet in the same spot from which you jumped. As with a long jump, the DC is doubled if you do not get a running start of at least 20 feet.

High Jump Distance (1) Jump DC (2)
1 foot 4
2 foot 8
3 foot 12
4 foot 16
5 foot 20
6 foot 24
7 foot 28
8 foot 32

(1)Not including vertical reach, see below
(2) Requires a 20-foot running start. Without a running start, double the DC.

Obviously, the difficulty of reaching a given height varies according to the size of the character or creature. The maximum vertical reach (the height the creature can reach without jumping) for an average creature of a given size is shown on the table below. As a Medium-size creature, a typical human can reach eight feet without jumping.

Quadrupedal creatures do not have the same vertical reach as a bipedal creature. Treat them as being one size category smaller than they are.

Creature Size Vertical Reach
Colossal 128 ft
Gargantuan 64 ft
Huge 32 ft
Large 16 ft
Medium 8 ft
Small 4 ft
Tiny 2 ft
Diminutive 1 ft
Fine ½ ft

* Hop Up: You can jump up onto an object as tall as your waist, such as a table or small boulder, with a DC 10 Jump check. Doing so counts as 10 feet of movement, so if your speed is 30 feet, you could move 20 feet and then hop up onto a table. You do not need to get a running start to hop up, so the DC is not doubled if you do not get a running start.

* Jumping Down: If you intentionally jump from a height, you take less damage than when you accidentally fall. The DC to jump down from a height is 15. You do not have to get a running start to jump down, so the DC is not doubled if you do not get a running start.

If you succeed on the check, you take falling damage as if you had dropped 10 fewer feet than you actually did.

Action: A Jump check is included in your movement, so it is part of a move action. If you run out of movement mid- jump, your next action (on your next turn if necessary) must be a move action to complete the jump.

Special: Effects that increase your movement also increase your jumping distance since your check is modified by your speed.

If you have the Run feat, you get a +4 bonus on Jump checks for any jumps made after a running start.

If you have the Acrobatic feat, you get a +2 bonus on Jump checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Tumble, you get a +2 bonus on Jump checks. If you have five or more ranks in Jump, you get a +2 bonus on Tumble checks.

18. Knowledge (Int / Trained Only)

Like the Craft and Profession skills, Knowledge actually encompasses a number of unrelated skills. Knowledge represents a study of some body of lore, possibly an academic or even scientific discipline.

Below are listed typical fields of study.

* Arcana (Ancient mysteries, Magic traditions and societies, Arcane symbols, Cryptic phrases, Summoning or binding demons)

* Architecture and engineering (Buildings, Aqueducts, Bridges, Fortifications)

* Astrology (Nativity chart, Power of Astrology, Estimate date and hour)

* Geography (Lands, Terrain, Climate, People)

* History (Leaders, Wars, Migrations, Founding of cities and nations)

* Legends (Ballads, Folktales, Legends, Myths)

* Local (particular regions; This skill can be used in place of Geography, History, Nature, Nobility and Royalty, Religion, Underworld or Legends for questions relating to a specific region)

* Navigation (Landmarks, Map Reading, Stars)

* Nature (Animals, Plants, Seasons and cycles, Weather, Vermin, Were-beasts)

* Nobility and royalty (Lineages, Heraldry, Family trees, Mottoes, Personalities)

* Religion (Gods and goddesses, Mythic history, Ecclesiastic tradition)

* Stewardship (Agriculture, Collecting Rents, Expanding Holdings, Finances, Hospitality, Leadership, Raising Troops) : The ability to efficiently organise and run a manor, fortress, or other self-sustaining large organisation

* Underworld (Behaviour, Black Market, Contacts, Local Area, Speech) : The knowledge of how to survive on the city streets, including safe places to stay, etiquette, and the “laws” of the street.

* Warfare (Tactics, Battle Formations, Leading armies)

Check: Answering really easy questions within your field of study has a DC of 10, answering basic questions has a DC of 15 and answering really tough questions ranges DC 20 to DC 30.

In many cases, you can use this skill to identify monsters and their special powers or vulnerabilities. In general, the DC of such a check equals 10 + the monster’s Hit Dice. A successful check allows you to remember a bit of useful information about that monster.
For every five points by which your check result exceeds the DC, you recall another piece of useful information.

Action: In most cases, making a Knowledge check does not take an action; you simply know the answer or you do not.

Try Again: The check represents what you know. Thinking about a topic a second time does not let you know something that you never learned in the first place.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (architecture and engineering), you get a +2 bonus on Search checks made to find secret doors or hidden compartments.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (geography), you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks made to keep from getting lost or avoiding natural hazards.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (nature), you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks made in aboveground natural environments: aquatic,desert, forest, hill, marsh, mountains or plains.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (nobility and royalty), you get a +2 bonus on Diplomacy checks.

If you have five or more ranks in Survival, you get a +2 bonus on Knowledge (nature) checks.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (Local), you get a +2 bonus on Gather Information checks.

Special: Using the Knowledge (Warfare) skill is DC 12, plus the average number of combatants on either side of the encounter. It requires one full-round action to study the conflict, during which time the character cannot suffer damage (or the check fails). Once the check has been made it is a free action to deliver a piece of advice to an ally. If successful, the character has a number of tactical suggestions he can call out (or use himself) during the encounter equal to his Intelligence bonus plus half his level. Each use of a tactical suggestion allows the affected character to add +1 to hit and damage for their next attack action. These tactical suggestions can be as simple as ‘aim for the weak point under the arm!’ or ‘go after the little guy, he’s the weak link!’ and they can only aid actions that take place on or after the skilled character’s initiative. Failing this skill check will result in misinformation and doubt, penalising everyone on the character’s side with a –1 to hit penalty for the duration of the encounter.

A battlefield commander may also better orchestrate his forces by looking over the geography of the field of engagement and estimating how best his soldiers will need to use it. The commander must study the situation during 1 hour and the DC for this type of Tactics check is DC 20 plus 1 for every unit of ten or more soldiers (or five cavalry) that the character is trying to orchestrate. Failure means the army will be in a tactically disadvantageous position, giving the enemy a +1 bonus to all attack rolls for the first 5 rounds of combat. Success on the skill check gives the army’s allied units +1 to hit on all attack rolls for the first 5 rounds of combat. It should be noted that this version of the Tactics skill can only be used for massive army-level engagements, not small party-based skirmishes.

Special: The Knowledge (Local) skill check is limited to DC 20 from 1st to 10th level and to DC 30 from 11th to 20th level.

Special: Using the Knowledge (Astrology) skill is DC 20 to determine the exact date and the significance of the night sky or 10 to determine the exact time provided he has a clear view of the star.

Nativities: By casting a horoscope and creating a nativity chart, an astrologer can tell certain things about a person. To compute a horoscope, you must have access to astrological equipment, such as star charts. Nativities are powerful things and can be computed for creatures or objects. To create a nativity for a creature, you must know the exact time and place the creature was born. For objects, you must know the exact time and place the object’s creation began. If the nativity is created accurately (see DC chart), different bonuses can be gleaned. Complete familiarity (DC 25) is one of the most frightening aspects of a nativity – for any spell requiring familiarity with the subject, the nativity provides the greatest familiarity possible. A nativity can expose weaknesses (DC 30) of the subject, causing Curses and Hypnotism spells cast by the astrologer to have a +1 circumstance bonus to the magical attack roll. When someone or something becomes an open book (DC 35), skill checks used against the creature (such as Sense Motive or Bluff) or within the building (such as Stealth) or to the object (such as Craft to repair it), the check is made with a +5 circumstance bonus. The Games Master is to determine if a skill meets the criteria.

Power of Astrology: The passage of the world around the sun can have an effect on certain spells and rituals. On Equinoxes and Solstices, a successful Knowledge (astrology) check gives the character a +1 astrological bonus to Perform ritual) per 5 points over the DC if the rituals are performed around noon. The month of the Vernal Equinox is ruled by the red planet and influences violent spells, raising their save DCs by +1 if cast on this date with a successful Knowledge (astrology) check. The Summer Solstice is auspicial for hypnotisms and summonings, raising any save DCs for these spells by +1 if cast on this date with a successful Knowledge (astrology) check. Rituals performed during various phases of the moons can also create an astrological bonus if the Knowledge (astrology) check is made. During the New Moon, Necromancy, Immortality and Summonings spells gain a +1 astrological bonus to Magic Attack rolls. During the Crescent Moon, scholars gain a +1 astrological bonus to Divination spells to Magic Attack rolls. During the Half Moon, Hypnotism and Nature Magic spells earn the +1 astrological bonus to Magic Attack rolls. During the Gibbous Moon, Counterspells and Oriental Magic gain the +1 astrological bonus to Magic Attack rolls. During the Full Moon, Curses and Prestidigitation spells earn the +1 astrological bonus to Magic Attack rolls. The power of astrology can be used by making a Knowledge (astrology) check (DC 15), with success indicating he enjoys the benefits and drawbacks of the stars for his sorcery for the rest of the day. These benefits and drawbacks are noted as an astrological bonus to determine if bonuses stack together.

19. Open Lock (Dex / Trained Only)

Attempting an Open Lock check without a set of thieves’ tools imposes a –2 circumstance penalty on the check, even if a simple tool is employed. If you use masterwork thieves’ tools, you gain a +2 circumstance bonus on the check.

Check: The DC for opening a lock varies from 20 to 40, depending on the quality of the lock, as given on the table below.

Lock DC
Very Simple Lock 10
Average Lock 20
Good Lock 30
Amazing Lock 40

Action: Opening a lock is a full-round action.

Special: If you have the Nimble Fingers feat, you get a +2 bonus on Open Lock checks.

20. Perception (Wis)

Check: Your Perception check is made against either a DC or opposed to your target’s Stealth check.

Perception DC Sound
-10 A battle
0 People talking (1)
15 People whispering (1)
19 A cat stalking
30 An owl gliding for a kill

(1) If you beat the DC by 10 or more, you can make out what is being said, assuming you understand the language.

In the case of people trying to be quiet, the DCs given in the table could be replaced by Stealth checks where the indicated DCs would be the people’s average check results.

Sometimes a creature is not intentionally hiding but is still difficult to see, so a successful Perception check is necessary to notice it.

Perception is also used to detect someone in disguise (see the Disguise skill) and to read lips when you cannot hear or understand what someone is saying.

A penalty applies on such checks, depending on the distance between the two individuals or groups and an additional penalty may apply if the character making the Perception check is distracted and not concentrating on being observant.

Condition Penalty
Per 10 feet of distance -1
Spotter distracted -5

* Read Lips: To understand what someone is saying by reading lips, you must be within 30 feet of the speaker, be able to see him speak and understand the speaker’s language. This use of the skill is language-dependent. The base DC is 15 but it increases for complex speech or an inarticulate speaker. You must maintain a line of sight to the lips you are trying to read.

If your Perception check succeeds, you can understand the general content of a minute’s worth of speaking but you still usually miss certain details. If the check fails by four or less, you cannot read the speaker’s lips. If the check fails by five or more, you draw some incorrect conclusion about the speech. The check is rolled secretly in this case, so that you do not know whether you succeeded or missed by five.

Action: Every time you have a chance to hear or spot something in a reactive manner, you can make a Perception check without using an action. Trying to hear or spot something you failed to hear previously is a move action.

Try Again: You can try again to hear or spot something you failed to hear previously with no penalty.

Special: A fascinated creature takes a –4 penalty on Perception checks made as reactions.

If you have the Alertness feat, you get a +2 bonus on Perception checks.

A sleeping character may make Perception checks at a –10 penalty. A successful check awakens the sleeper.

21. Perform (Cha)

Like Craft, Knowledge and Profession, Perform is actually comprised of a number of separate skills.

You may have several Perform skills, each with its own ranks, each purchased as a separate skill.

Each of the nine categories of the Perform skill includes a variety of methods, instruments or techniques, a small list of which is provided for each category below.

* Act (comedy, drama, mime)

* Comedy (buffoonery, limericks, joke-telling)

* Dance (ballet, waltz, jig)

* Oratory (epic, ode, storytelling)

* Percussion instruments (bells, chimes, drums, gong)

* String instruments (fiddle, harp, lute, mandolin)

* Wind instruments (flute, pan pipes, recorder, shawm,trumpet)

* Sing (ballad, chant, melody)

* Ritual (civic ceremony, religion, sorcerous)

Check: You can impress audiences with your talent and skill.

Perform DC Performance
10 Routine performance. Trying to earn money by playing in public is essentially begging. You can earn 1d4 silver quarters per day.
15 Enjoyable performance. In a prosperous city, you can earn 2d6 silver quarters per day.
20 Great performance. In a prosperous city, you can earn 1d8 silver pieces per day.In time, you may be invited to join a professional troupe and may develop a regional reputation.
25 Memorable performance. In a prosperous city, you can earn 3d6 silver pieces per day. In time, you may come to the attention of noble patrons and develop a national reputation.
30 Extraordinary performance. In a prosperous city, you can earn 6d6 silver pieces per day. In time, you may draw attention from distant potential patrons or even from demons of other worlds.

A masterwork musical instrument gives you a +2 circumstance bonus on Perform checks that involve its use.

* Perform (ritual): This skill cannot be used to impress an audience, unlike the other Perform skills. Its use is restricted to ceremonial rites and sorcerous gatherings. In Conan the Roleplaying Game, it is most commonly used in power rituals to increase the might of a sorcerer. See the Sorcery chapter for details.

Action: Trying to earn money by playing in public requires anywhere from an evening’s work to a full day’s performance.

Try Again: Retries are allowed but they do not negate previous failures. An audience that has been unimpressed in the past is likely to be prejudiced against future performances. Increase the DC by two for each previous failure.

Special: In addition to using the Perform skill, you can entertain people with Sleight of Hand, Tumbling, Tightrope walking, Gladiatorial combat and Feats of bravery.

22. Profession (Wis / Trained Only)

Like Craft, Knowledge and Perform, Profession is actually comprised of a number of separate skills. You may have several Profession skills, each with its own ranks, each purchased as a separate skill.

While a Craft skill represents ability in creating or making an item, a Profession skill represents an aptitude in a vocation that requires a broader range of less specific knowledge.

Check: You can practice your trade and make a decent living, earning about half your Profession checkresult in silver pieces per week of dedicatedwork. You know how to use the tools of your trade, how to perform the profession’s daily tasks, how to supervise helpers and how to handle common problems.

Action: A single check generally represents a week of work.

Try Again: An attempt to use a Profession skill to earn an income cannot be retried. You are stuck with whateverweekly wage your check result brings you. Another check may be made after a week to determine a new income for the next period of time. An attempt to accomplish some specific task can usually be retried.

Untrained: Characters without any ranks in the required Profession earn an average of half a silver piece per day.

23. Ride (Dex)

If you attempt to ride a creature that is ill suited as a mount, you take a –5 penalty on your Ride checks.

Check: Typical riding actions do not require checks. You can saddle, mount, ride and dismount from a mount without a problem.

The following tasks do require checks:

Task Ride DC
Guide with knees 5
Stay in saddle 5
Fight with warhorse 10
Cover 15
Soft fall 15
Leap 15
Spur mount 15
Control mount in battle 20
Fast mount or dismount 20 (1)

(1) Armour check penalties applies.

* Guide with Knees: You can react instantly to guide your mount with your knees so that you can use both hands in combat. Make your Ride check at the start of your turn. If you fail, you can use only one hand in the round because you need to use the other to control your mount.

* Stay in Saddle: You can react instantly to try to avoid falling when your mount rears or bolts unexpectedly or when you take damage. This does not take an action.

* Fight with Warhorse: If you direct your war-trained mount to attack in battle, you can still make your own attack or attacks normally. This is a free action.

* Cover: You can react instantly to drop down and hang alongside your mount, using it as cover. You cannot attack or cast spells while using your mount as cover. If you fail your Ride check, you do not get the cover benefit. This does not take an action.

* Soft Fall: You can react instantly to try to take no damage when you fall off a mount, such as when it is killed or when it falls. If you fail your Ride check, you take 1d6 points of falling damage. This does not take an action.

* Leap: You can get your mount to leap obstacles as part of its movement. Use your Ride modifier or the mount’s Jump modifier, whichever is lower, to see how far the creature can jump. If you fail your Ride check, you fall off the mount and take the appropriate falling damage, which is at least 1d6 points, when it leaps. This does not take an action but is part of the mount’s movement.

* Spur Mount: You can spur your mount to greater speed with a move action. A successful Ride check increases the mount’s speed by 10 feet for one round but deals one point of damage to the creature. You can use this ability every round but each consecutive round of additional speed deals twice as much damage to the mount as the previous round: two points, four points, eight points and so on.

* Control Mount in Battle: As a move action, you can attempt to control a light horse, workhorse or other mount not trained for combat riding while in battle. If you fail the Ride check, you can do nothing else in that round. You do not need to roll for warhorses.

* Fast Mount or Dismount: You can attempt to mount or dismount from a mount of up to one size category larger than yourself as a free action, provided that you still have a move action available that round. If you fail the Ride check, mounting or dismounting is a move action. You cannot use fast mount or dismount on a mount more than one size category larger than yourself.

Action: Mounting or dismounting normally is a move action. Other checks are move actions, free actions or no action at all, as noted above.

Special: If you are riding bareback, you take a –5 penalty on Ride checks.

If your mount has a military saddle you get a +2 circumstance bonus on Ride checks related to staying in the saddle.

The Ride skill is a prerequisite for the feats Mounted Archery, Mounted Combat, Ride-By Attack, Spirited Charge andTrample.

If you have the Animal Affinity feat, you get a +2 bonus on Ride checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Handle Animal, you get a +2 bonus on Ride checks.

Check: You must generally be within 10 feet of the object or surface to be searched. The table below gives DCs for typical tasks involving the Search skill.

Task Search DC
Ransack a chest full of junk to find acertain item 10
Notice a typical secret door or a simple trap 20
Find a difficult non-magical trap (thief only) 21 or higher
Notice a well-hidden secret door 30
Find a footprint Varies (1)

(1) A successful Search check can find a footprint or similar sign of a creature’s passage but will not let you find or follow a trail. See the Track feat for the appropriate DC.

Action: It takes a full-round action to search a five foot by five foot area or a volume of goods five feet on a side.

Special: At first level, a borderer gains a +1 circumstance bonus to Search checks when within his favoured terrain.

If you have the Investigator feat, you get a +2 bonus on Search checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Search, you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks to find or follow tracks.If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (architecture and engineering), you get a +2 bonus on Search checks to find secret doors or hidden compartments.

Restriction: While anyone can use Search to find a trap the DC of which is 20 or lower, only a thief can find traps with higher DCs.

25. Sense Motive (Wis)

Check: A successful check lets you avoid being bluffed; see the Bluff skill above. You can also use this skill to determine when ‘something is up’ (that is, when something odd is going on) or to assess someone’s trustworthiness.

Task Sense Motive DC
Hunch 20
Sense hyptotism 20
Discern secret message Varies

* Hunch: This use of the skill involves making a gut assessment of a social situation. You may get the feeling from another’s behaviour that something is wrong, such as when you are talking to an impostor. Alternatively, you may get the feeling that someone is trustworthy.

* Sense Hypnotism: You can tell that someone’s behaviour is being influenced by a hypnotism effect (see Sorcery) even if that person is not aware of it.

* Discern Secret Message: You may use Sense Motive to detect that a hidden message is being transmitted via the Bluff skill. In this case, your Sense Motive check is opposed by the Bluff check of the character transmitting the message. For each piece of information you are missing relating to the message, take a –2 penalty on your Sense Motive check.

If you succeed by four or less, you know that something hidden is being communicated but you cannot learn anything specific about its content. If you beat the DC by five or more, you intercept and understand the message. If you fail by four or less, you do not detect any hidden communication. If you fail by five or more, you infer some false information.

Action: Trying to gain information with Sense Motive generally takes at least one minute. You could spend a whole evening trying to get a sense of the people around you.

Try Again: You may not try this check again, though you may make a Sense Motive check for each Bluff check made against you.

Special: If you have the Negotiator feat, you get a +2 bonus on Sense Motive checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Sense Motive, you get a +2 bonus on Diplomacy checks.

26. Sleight of Hand (Dex / Trained Only / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: A DC 10 Sleight of Hand check lets you palm a coin-sized, unattended object. Performing a minor feat of legerdemain, such as making a coin disappear, also has a DC of 10 unless an observer is determined to note where the item went. When you use this skill under close observation, your skill check is opposed by the observer’s Perception check. The observer’s success does not prevent you from performing the action, just from doing it unnoticed.

You can hide a small object (including a light weapon or an easily concealed ranged weapon, such as a dart or sling) on your body. Your Sleight of Hand check is opposed by the Perception check of anyone observing you or the Search check of anyone frisking you. In the latter case, the searcher gains a +4 bonus on the Search check, since it is generally easier to find such an object than to hide it.

A dagger is easier to hide than most light weapons and grants you a +2 bonus on your Sleight of Hand check to conceal it. An extraordinarily small object, such as a coin, shuriken or ring grants you a +4 bonus on your Sleight of Hand check to conceal it. Heavy or baggy clothing (such as a cloak) grants you a +2 bonus on the check.

Drawing a hidden weapon is a standard action and does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

If you try to take something from another creature, you must make a DC 20 Sleight of Hand check to obtain it. The opponent makes a Perception check to detect the attempt, opposed by the same Sleight of Hand check result you achieved when you tried to grab the item. An opponent who succeeds on this check notices the attempt, regardless of whether you got the item.

You can also use Sleight of Hand to entertain an audience as though you were using the Perform skill. In such a case, your ‘act’ encompasses elements of legerdemain, juggling and the like.

Action: Any Sleight of Hand check is normally a standard action. However, you may perform a Sleight of Hand check as a free action by taking a –20 penalty on the check.

Try Again: You may try this check again but after an initial failure, a second Sleight of Hand attempt against the same target (or while you are being watched by the same observer who noticed your previous attempt) increases the DC for the task by 10.

Special: If you have the Deft Hands feat, you get a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Bluff, you get a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand checks.

Untrained: An untrained Sleight of Hand check is simply a Dexterity check. Without actual training, you cannot succeed on any Sleight of Hand check with a DC higher than 10, except for hiding an object on your body.

Sleight of Hand DC Task
10 Palm a coin-sized object, make a coin disappear
20 Lift a small object from a person

27. Stealth (Dex / Armour Check Penalty)

Check: Your Stealth check is opposed by the Perception check of anyone who might detect you. This skill is used when you try to hide or be silent.

You can move up to one- half your normal speed and be stealth with no penalty. When moving at a speed faster than one-half but slower than your normal speed, you take a –5 penalty. It is practically impossible (–20 penalty) to be stealth while attacking, running or charging.

A creature larger or smaller than Medium takes a size bonus or penalty on Stealth checks depending on its size category, as follows: Fine +16, Diminutive +12, Tiny +8, Small +4, Large –4, Huge –8, Gargantuan –12, Colossal –16

You need cover or concealment in order to attempt to Hide yourself. Total cover or total concealment usually (but not always; see Special, below) obviates the need for a Hide check, since nothing can see you anyway.

If people are observing you, even casually, you cannot hide. You can run around a corner or behind cover so that you are out of sight and then hide but those who are watching you will at least know where you went.

If your observers are momentarily distracted (such as by a Bluff check; see below), you can attempt to hide. When the others turn their attention from you, you can attempt a Stealth check if you can get to a hiding place of some kind. As a general guideline, the hiding place has to be within one foot per rank you have in Stealth. This check, however, is made at a –10 penalty because you have to move fast.

* Sniping: If you are successfully hidden at least 10 feet from your target, you can make one ranged attack, then immediately hide again. You take a –20 penalty on your Stealth check to conceal yourself after the shot.

* Creating a Diversion to Hide: You can use Bluff to help you hide. A successful Bluff check can give you the momentary diversion you need to attempt a Stealth check while people are aware of you.

Noisy surfaces, such as bogs or undergrowth, are difficult to move across silently. When you try to sneak across such a surface, you take a penalty on your Stealth check as indicated below.

Surface Check Modifier
Noisy (scree, shallow or deep bog, undergrowth, dense rubble) -2
Very noisy (dense undergrowth, deep snow) -5

Action: Normally, you make a Stealth check is included in your movement or other activity, so it is part of another action.

Special: If you are invisible, you gain a +20 bonus on Stealth checks if you are immobile, or a +10 bonus on Stealth checks if you are moving.

If you have the Stealthy feat, you get a +2 bonus on Stealth checks.

28. Survival (Wis)

Check: You can keep yourself and others safe and fed in the wild. The table overleaf gives the DCs for various tasks that require Survival checks.

Survival does not allow you to follow difficult tracks unless you have the Track feat. See the Restriction section below.

Action: A single Survival check may represent activity over the course of hours or a full day. A Survival check made to find tracks is at least a full-round action and may take even longer.

Try Again: For getting along in the wild or for gaining the Fortitude saving throw bonus noted in the table above, make a Survival check once every 24 hours. The result of that check applies until the next check is made. To avoid getting lost or avoid natural hazards, make a Survival check whenever the situation calls for one.

Retries to avoid getting lost in a specific situation or to avoid a specific natural hazard are not allowed. You can retry a failed check for finding tracks after one hour (outdoors) or 10 minutes (indoors) of searching.

Restriction: While anyone can use Survival to find tracks (regardless of the DC) or to follow tracks when the DC for the task is 10 or lower, only a character with the Track feat can use Survival to follow tracks when the task has a higher DC.

Special: If you have five or more ranks in Survival, you can automatically determine where true north lies in relation to your position.

If you have the Self-Sufficient feat, you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Survival, you get a +2 bonus on Knowledge (nature) checks.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (nature), you get a +2 bonuson Survival checks in aboveground natural environments: aquatic, desert, forest, hill, marsh, mountains and plains.

If you have five or more ranks in Knowledge (geography), you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks to keep from getting lost or to avoid natural hazards.

If you have five or more ranks in Search, you get a +2 bonus on Survival checks to find or follow tracks.

Survival DC Task
10 Get along in the wild. Move up to one-half your overland speed while hunting and foraging, thus removing the need for food or water supplies for yourself. You can provide food and water for one other person for every two points by which your check result exceeds 10.
15 Gain a +2 bonus on all Fortitude saving throws against severe weather while moving up to one-half your overland speed or gain a +4 bonus if you remain stationary. You may grant the same bonus to one other character for every point by which your Survival check result exceeds 15.
15 Keep from getting lost or avoid natural hazards, such as quicksand.
15 Predict the weather up to 24 hours in advance. For every five points by which your Survival check result exceeds 15, you can predict the weather for one additional day.
Varies Follow tracks (see the Track feat).

29. Swim (Str / Armour Penalty)

Check: Make a Swim check once per round while you are in the water. Success means you may swim at up to one- half your speed as a full-round action or at one-quarter your speed as a move action. If you fail by four or less, you make no progress through the water. If you fail by five or more, you go underwater.

If you are underwater, either because you failed a Swim check or because you are swimming underwater intentionally, you must hold your breath. You can hold your breath for a number of rounds equal to your Constitution score but only if you do nothing other than take move actions or free actions. If you take a standard action or a full-round action, such as making an attack, the remainder of the time you can hold your breath is reduced by one round.

Effectively, if you are in combat you can hold your breath only half as long as normal. After that period of time, you must make a DC 10 Constitution check every round to continue holding your breath. The DC for that check increases by one each round. If you fail the Constitution check, you begin to drown.

The DC for the Swim check depends on the water, as given on the table below. 

Water Swim DC
Calm water 10
Rough water 15
Stormy water 20 (1)

(1) You can't take 10 on a swim check in stormy water, even if you aren't otherwise being threatened or distracted.

Each hour that you swim, you must make a DC 20 Swim check or take 1d6 points of nonlethal damage from fatigue.

Action: A successful Swim check allows you to swim one- quarter of your speed as a move action or one-half your speed as a full-round action.

Special: Swim checks are subject to double the normal armour check penalty and encumbrance penalty.

If you have the Athletic feat, you get a +2 bonus on Swim checks.

If you have the Endurance feat, you get a +4 bonus on Swim checks made to avoid taking nonlethal damage from fatigue.

A creature with a swim speed can move through water at its indicated speed without making Swim checks. It gains a +8 racial bonus on any Swim check to perform a special action or avoid a hazard. The creature always can choose to take 10 on a Swim check, even if distracted or endangered when swimming. Such a creature can use the run action while swimming, provided that it swims in a straight line.

30. Tumble (Dex / Trained Only /Armour Check Penalty)

You cannot use this skill if your speed has been reduced by armour, excess equipment or loot.

Check: You can land softly when you fall or tumble past opponents. You can also tumble to entertain an audience as though using the Perform skill. The DCs for various tasks involving the Tumble skill are given in the table below.

Tumble DC Task
15 Treat a fall as if it were 10 feet shorter than it really is when determining damage.
15 Tumble at one-half speed as part of normal movement, provoking no attacks of opportunity while doing so. Failure means you provoke attacks of opportunity normally. Check separately for each opponent you move past, in the order in which you pass them (Player’s choice of order in case of a tie). Each additional enemy after the first adds +2 to the Tumble DC.
25 Tumble at one-half speed through an area occupied by an enemy (over, under or around the opponent) as part of normal movement, provoking no attacks of opportunity while doing so. Failure means you stop before entering the enemy-occupied area and provoke an attack of opportunity from that enemy. Check separately for each opponent. Each additional enemy after the first adds +2 to the Tumble DC.

Obstructed or otherwise treacherous surfaces, such as natural cavern floors or undergrowth, are tough to tumble through. The DC for any Tumble check made to tumble on these surfaces is modified as indicated.

Task DC Modifier
Lightly obstructed (scree, light rubble, shallow bog (1), undergrowth) +2
Severely obstructed (natural cavern floor, dense rubble, dense undergrowth) +5
Lightly slippery (wet floor) +2
Severely slippery (ice sheet) +5
Sloped or angled +2

* Tumbling is impossible in a deep bog.

* Accelerated Tumbling: You try to tumble past or through enemies more quickly than normal. By accepting a –10 penalty on your Tumble checks, you can move at your full speed instead of one-half your speed.

Action: Tumbling is part of movement, so a Tumble check is part of a move action.

Try Again: An audience, once it has judged a tumbler as an uninteresting performer, is not receptive to repeat performances. You can try to reduce damage from a fall as an instant reaction only once per fall.

Special: If you have five or more ranks in Tumble, you gain an additional +1 dodge bonus to Dodge Defence when fighting defensively, as well as the usual +2 bonus to Defence.

If you have five or more ranks in Tumble, you gain an additional +2 dodge bonus to Dodge Defence when executing the total defence standard action as well as the usual +4 bonus to Defence.

If you have the Acrobatic feat, you get a +2 bonus on Tumble checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Tumble, you get a +2 bonus on Balance and Jump checks.

If you have five or more ranks in Jump, you get a +2 bonus on Tumble checks.

31. Use Rope (Dex)

Check: Most tasks with a rope are relatively simple. The DCs for various tasks utilising this skill are summarised on the table below.

Use Rope DC Task
10 Tie a firm knot
10 (1) Secure a grappling hook
15 Tie a special knot, such as one that slips, slides slowly or loosens with a tug
15 Tie a rope around yourself one-handed
15 Splice two ropes together
Varies Bind a character

* Add two to the DC for every 10 feet the hook is thrown; see below.

* Secure a Grappling Hook: Securing a grappling hook requires a Use Rope check, with a DC of 10, +2 for every 10 feet of distance the grappling hook isthrown, to a maximum DC of 20 at 50 feet. Failure by four or less indicates that the hook fails to catch and falls, allowing you to try again. Failure by five or more indicates that the grappling hook initially holds but comes loose after 1d4 rounds of supporting weight. This check is made secretly so you do not know whether the rope will hold your weight.

* Bind a Character: When you bind another character with a rope, any Escape Artist check that the bound character makes is opposed by your Use Rope check. You get a +10 bonus on this check because it is easier to bind someone than to escape from bonds. You do not even make your Use Rope check until someone tries to escape.

Action: Throwing a grappling hook is a standard action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Tying a knot, tying a special knot or tying a rope around yourself one-handed is a full-round action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Splicing two ropes together takes five minutes. Binding a character takes one minute.

Special: A silk rope gives you a +2 circumstance bonus on Use Rope checks.

If you have the Deft Hands feat, you get a +2 bonus on Use Rope checks.

Synergy: If you have five or more ranks in Use Rope, you get a +2 bonus on Climb checks made to climb a rope, a knotted rope or a rope-and-wall combination.

If you have five or more ranks in Use Rope, you get a +2 bonus on Escape Artist checks when escaping from rope bonds.

If you have five or more ranks in Escape Artist, you get a +2 bonus on checks made to bind someone.